Tips for Teaching High School and College Students

Developmental Characteristics

  • Continue to need help on distinguishing wants and needs
  • Want to be more independent financially, while is somewhat dependent
  • Their school and social life cost more
  • Peers often have more influence than parents
  • Want to have money to manage
  • May want to use credits
  • Experience the good and bad consequences of spending
  • Some children take student loan for their colleges
  • Understand differences between gross and net income
  • Have some concepts on employment benefits
  • Understand they can exchange time and energy for money
  • May do some part-time jobs

Suggested Teaching Activities

  • Encourage children to apply scholarships
  • Continue to teach children to manage money wisely
  • Let children do some family grocery shopping to gain more experience
  • Help children on their saving and spending planning
  • Encourage children to involve in family finance planning
  • Involve children in planning for a long-term financing arrangement
  • Before children apply for jobs, discuss work hours considering study time and household responsibilities
  • Encourage children to attend internships
  • Help children complete income tax forms if they have part-time jobs
  • Compute miles per gallon on a family car to encourage saving
  • Explain auto insurance to children
  • Discuss ways to deal with risk of potential financial loss
  • Teach children about investing while explain risk of market

How to Choose the Best College?

It depends on each applicant’s individual objective condition and subjective condition, namely, what do you what? What can you reach?

After considering how to choose a right major for you (refer to the previous post), at least you have some ideas that you may interest in one or several directions.

To find the right college for you, to know yourself and potential colleges is the key.

What do you what? Questions related your subjective conditions.

What is your career goal?
A clear goal always motivates a person. It is an essential factor for choosing a college.

Want a challenging academic environment or not?
Most of the famous universities are very competitive and have very challenging academic courses, while the reward is also big. Usually the students can get to know famous professors and get better education environments, and the graduates have more job opportunity, more chance to succeed in some fields.

What major or programs of study interests you?
Enjoying what you are doing is the best motivation.

Prefer a rural, suburban, or urban environment?
Some people like quiet study environment, while some like exciting big city life styles.

Want a college that is near your home?
If you choose a college near your home, it is easy to meet family and take advantage of the network you and your family already built. In addition, it is cost effective.

Want scholarship or financial aid?
Usually anyone wants scholarship, for financial aid depends on each individual’s financial situation, some may do not need it.

Public school or private school or does not matter?
Public schools are usually funded primarily by the state and are governed by a group of publicly-elected officials and private schools are the opposite of public schools, with most of their funding coming from private sources and are run by private individuals or organizations. Usually, public schools are less costly than private schools; however, some private schools have scholarships and good financial aid programs.

Want a school with diversity races?
In a country where a lot of cultures and races mix together, some people consider it important to evaluate the racial ratio in colleges. In U.S.A, usually, the minority ethnic races include Asians, Hispanics and African-Americans.

What can you reach? Questions related you objective conditions.

What are your academic skills and talent?
Including your high school ranking, GPA score, SAT scores and other things show your talent and skills, which make you stand out. For example, if you do not have a good GPA, you can not apply some colleges.

Can you afford the college?
Consider the financial aspects. Get a clear picture of the costs, such as tuition, class fees, housing, and meal plans. Look into financial aid and scholarships.

Tips

  1. Investigate at least three to five colleges which interest to you, and your grades and SAT or ACT scores meet the requirements. A little research and an open mind can greatly increase the odds that you make a good college choice.
  2. Try to find out the answers of the following questions.
    • How long will it take to complete the studies?
    • Who is teaching in the area of study?
    • Is there any famous professor in the area of study?
    • What are the potential job opportunities after graduation?
  3. Because until the very end of the application process, you can only know how much it will cost to attend a college, do not rule out it early because of cost. Many colleges offer scholarships, financial aid, and tuition installment plans.
  4. Deadlines are very important for your application, whether for college applications, SAT or ACT registration, financial aid, scholarships, campus housing, etc. Write down a schedule and adhere strictly to all deadlines.
  5. Visit at least your top two or three choices, before making your final college selection decision. Like the old saying, believe it until see it.

Career Trend

Experts predict where the jobs will be in 2014

By understanding the major trends that are affecting our lives, parents will be able to play an active role in helping children planning and guiding their career. However, predicting future is the most difficult thing, there is no guarantee. Almost all jobs, no matter how secure they are, due to the economy and unexpected changes in technology and other factors, they will experience ups and downs. The key to survive and thrive in the career is to be the best at what we do and be flexible.

Ten Fastest Growing Occupations for College Grads

  1. Network systems and data communications analysts
  2. Physician assistants
  3. Computer software engineers, applications
  4. Computer systems analysts
  5. Secondary school teachers, except special and vocational education
  6. Computer software engineers, systems software
  7. Network and computer systems administrators
  8. Database administrators
  9. Physical therapists
  10. Forensic science technicians

Source: United States Bureau of Labor Statistics www.bls.gov